New Spring

by Robert Jordan

 

You could call this a break from the main series, which is taking its toll. I’m treating it as such, but I’d always planned on reading the books in publication order; I usually figure that the author’s thought processes should be roughly mirrored by the reader’s. Basically, I knew Jordan wouldn’t put spoilers in a prequel that was published before the final four installments of the main series. Regardless, this is the order in which I chose to read them, so here goes.

As I alluded to just now, I was looking for a change of pace, and I got one. Instead of continuing the story, New Spring–prequel that it is–takes us back in time about twenty years, to the end of the Aiel War. New SpringWe rendez-vous with Moiraine, living with her friend Siuan as an Accepted in Tar Valon, as well as Lan, hoping to return to the Blight when the war finally ends. Moiraine and Siuan, through sheer dumb luck, end up as the only living witnesses to the prophecy that the Dragon has been reborn, and the two friends take up the task of finding him before disaster strikes.

Moiraine and Lan haven’t yet crossed paths, so you know there’s gonna be an awesome meet-cute coming up. Moiraine’s journey leads her north, just as Lan discovers the possibility that an army is being raised in his name. Each with their own secret task ahead of them, the pair become reluctant companions and develop a grudging respect for one another’s ability. Not exactly a surprise ending.

There’s a plot here, but the specifics aren’t revealed until pretty much the last couple of chapters. The audience knows that Lan’s kamikaze mission won’t proceed as planned, and that Moiraine and Siuan aren’t going to find the Dragon for, oh, about eighteen years. We also know that any minor characters we haven’t alredy met aren’t going to matter much. This knowledge lets the story and the characters breathe a little bit; we’re not constantly waiting for Jordan to decide that something else is important, and we can just enjoy the events as they unfold.

The story Jordan creates is interesting and vibrant, so much so that, once again, I lamented Jordan’s refusal to focus on a single narrative in most of his books. Indeed, I was reminded of how much fun The Eye of the World was when I was first beginning the series. It’s the difference between a world of possibility and a world of obligation; obligations to plot, to characters, to things we already know have happened or will happen. My only complaint, and it’s minor, is that New Spring, like many prequels, suffers from Baby Muppets syndrome. That is to say, we’re introduced to the younger versions of so many characters that it becomes distracting and implausible. In this case, are we really to believe that, despite Aes Sedai living to be hundreds of years old, most of the ones we’ve met are in their early twenties around the time of New Spring? Most of the older Aes Sedai that we meet end up dead, with the exception of Cadsuane, who’s pretty much known as the oldest Aes Sedai around. It’s not a huge deal, but it detracts from the realism a bit.

Truthfully, knowing that this book was about Moiraine, I expected and hoped that it would lead to some indication that she had survived her apparent-but-corpseless death in book five. I mean, Gandalf fell fighting the Balrog, but came back better than ever. Thom Merillin came back from his apparent death, and that was in the first book of this series! I liked Moiraine as a character, so perhaps it was my wishful thinking on my part. In any event, we don’t really get any hints as to what’s happening in the last four books, at least as far as I can tell. It looks like Jordan set out to write a straightforward prequel, not a key to unlocking any mysteries. And that’s okay. Actually, it’s great.

New Spring is a breath of fresh air after ten books that are increasingly bogged down by plot and a mess of characters. It’s enough to remind me of why I liked Jordan’s writing in the first place, and it’s a glimmer of hope that perhaps the series will return to form before the end.

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